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In the 1990s, thousands of people used them.  Do you remember what ticket validators looked like on buses?

In the 1990s, thousands of people used them. Do you remember what ticket validators looked like on buses?

Today, after boarding a bus or tram, you don’t even have to approach the ticket validator, because you can buy tickets online and have them on your phone in case of an inspection. There was a time when you not only had to stop at the razor, but also use some force. What did ticket validators look like in public transport vehicles in the 1990s?

We enter the tram or bus, insert the ticket into the slot, take it out after a second and take a seat. And if we bought the ticket online, we don’t even have to do that. In the past, hardly anyone had a mobile phone, let alone bought tickets via it. Everyone had to get their own travel insurance card, which had to be validated when getting on the bus or tram. Today we remember what validators looked like in the 1990s.

What did cash registers look like in the 1990s?

There is no shortage of posts with memories on the Internet. Recently, one of them appeared on , literally translated as: Things with faces. The author of the entry published a photo of an old cash register from Poland from the 1990s. The photo received a lot of comments from people who remember this image very well. There are also photos of other validators that once “decorated” the interiors of city buses and trams. And these were different. Some of them had a ticket inserted into them and had to be pressed to effectively punch holes in them. For others, it was enough to simply insert the cardboard and wait a while until the machine printed the date.

Thousands of people used them in the 1990s. Do you remember what ticket validators looked like on buses? photo: Facebook / Things with faces

I remember both the one from the post and these [w komentarzach]and before them there were also those with a lever with a black ball at the end.

There was also a humorous discussion between the users. One of them showed the above-mentioned validator on the switch and wrote: “And I remember those in trams”, to which another person asked: “So how old are you? 100?” – “Half of a hundred.” It turns out that the memory of old models of validating machines does not indicate advanced age, but rather outdated devices that were still used in some places long after more modern machines came into use.

I remember that too!!! I’m 47 years old and apparently have a good memory.

I’m 41 years old and I remember it too.

“Cancelled? Well, canceled. And since you’re traveling on this ticket for the 100th time…”

Just like nowadays, there was also no shortage of people who had their tickets stuck to their ears and used single-use tickets many times. A bit of creativity was enough to iron out holes in the tickets or blur the printed date. Facebook users shared their ways of outsmarting the system.

I always pressed lightly. I had a ticket for water to soak home, an iron, a tiny ironing machine and a ticket for a few weeks.

It was stretched so that everything was blurry. The control couldn’t read the code and you deleted it? Well, deleted. And since you’re traveling on this ticket for the 100th time…

Holes in the ticket were quickly made with matches

– we read.

If you also want to reminisce a bit, please visit our gallery. You will find it at the top of the article. Inside we placed photos of various validators that were used years ago. And some of them can still be seen on public transport.

Source: Gazeta

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